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Day Trip - Birding in Fraser's Hill - 16th March 2016

Wednesday, March 16, 2016


Today, I had the opportunity to take Heather up to Fraser's Hill, something different  from what she experienced in Singapore a few days before. As usual on the way up towards the Gap in the morning, we will certainly not miss the Oriental Magpie Robin. Lots of Barbet callings too. Didn't bother to stop so we head up straight to the hill station. Before reaching the upper gate, there was a Slaty-backed Forktail (we saw this bird again when we walked along the path towards Jeriau waterfall).

As soon as we arrived, we stopped by near the arch. Totally surprised to see a Red-bearded Bee-eater perching so low and close to where we were standing. There were several Long-tailed Sibia and Silver-eared Mesia too. For the next 30 minutes we birded between this spot and the Chinese school, and we were rewarded with Black-throated Sunbird, Blue Nuthatch, Mountain Fulvetta, Lesser Shortwing, and Golden Babbler. Somewhere behind the golf course, we had birds such as Large Niltava, Rufous-browed Flycatcher, White-browed (Blyth's) Shrike-babbler, Black-eared Shrike-babbler, Orange-bellied Leafbird, Streaked Spiderhunter, Buff-breasted Babbler, Chestnut-capped (Spectacled) Laughingthrush, Black-browed Barbet, Sultan Tit, Bay Woodpecker (glimpse) and others. Before lunch, we were along the path towards the waterfall where we nailed 2 Slaty-backed Forktail,  Everett's White-eye, Yellow-bellied Prinia, Little Cuckoo-dove and Mountain Bulbul. There were also Hill Blue Flycatcher on the road before reaching the car park to the waterfall. 

After lunch, we stopped by near a small playground and saw 4 Javan Cuckooshrike. Meanwhile, at the Telekom Loop, we had a nesting Mountain Imperial Pigeon, Black Laughingthrush, Green-billed Malkoha, Fire-tufted Barbet, Black-and-Crimson Oriole, Chestnut-crowned Warbler, Mountain Tailorbird, White-throated Fantail, Chestnut-crowned (Malayan) Laughingthrush and several other birds. Before going down the New Road for late afternoon birding, we stopped by at the Flycatcher stakeout but we were not able to add anything new to our day list except for a heard only Greater Yellownape. As we were about to leave the hill station, we finally saw a Lesser Yellownape. 

On the New Road and the Gap, we managed 4 species of woodpecker that includes Crimson-winged Woodpecker, Checker-throated Woodpecker, Maroon Woodpecker and Bamboo Woodpecker (which was the finale for the day).

Here is the bird list for the day.
  1. Crested Serpent Eagle
  2. Little Cuckoo-dove
  3. Blue-crowned Hanging Parrot
  4. Green-billed Malkoha
  5. Collared Owlet (Heard Only)
  6. Red-bearded Bee-eater
  7. Fire-tufted Barbet
  8. Red-throated Barbet (Heard Only)
  9. Gold-whiskered Barbet (Heard Only)
  10. Black-browed Barbet
  11. Blue-eared Barbet (Heard Only)
  12. Greater Yellownape (Heard Only)
  13. Lesser Yellownape
  14. Crimson-winged Woodpecker
  15. Checker-throated Woodpecker
  16. Bay Woodpecker
  17. Maroon Woodpecker
  18. Bamboo Woodpecker
  19. Pacific Swallow
  20. Rufous-bellied Swallow
  21. Large Woodshrike
  22. Javan Cuckooshrike
  23. Fiery Minivet
  24. Scarlet Minivet
  25. Blue-winged Leafbird
  26. Orange-bellied Leafbird
  27. Black-crested Bulbul
  28. Yellow-vented Bulbul
  29. Ochraceous Bulbul
  30. Mountain Bulbul
  31. Bronze Drongo
  32. Lesser Racket-tailed Drongo
  33. Black-and-Crimson Oriole
  34. Large-billed Crow (flying away)
  35. Sultan Tit
  36. Blue Nuthatch
  37. Golden Babbler
  38. Grey-throated Babbler
  39. Striped Tit-babbler (Heard Only)
  40. Black Laughingthrush
  41. Chestnut-capped Laughingthrush
  42. Chestnut-crowned Laughingthrush
  43. Silver-eared Mesia
  44. White-browed Shrike-babbler
  45. Black-eared Shrike-babbler
  46. Blue-winged Minla
  47. Chestnut-crowned Warbler
  48. Yellow-bellied Warbler
  49. Mountain Tailorbird
  50. Yellow-bellied Prinia
  51. Dark-sided Flycatcher
  52. Asian Brown Flycatcher
  53. Verditer Flycatcher
  54. Mugimaki Flycatcher (Heard Only)
  55. Rufous-browed Flycatcher
  56. Little Pied Flycatcher
  57. Large Niltava
  58. Hill Blue Flycatcher
  59. White-throated Fantail
  60. Black-throated Sunbird
  61. Streaked Spiderhunter
  62. Everett's White-eye

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Birds & Wildlife in Malaysia

About Me

I'm a bird watcher, digiscoper, photographer and a licensed nature guide. Welcome to my 'A Malaysian Birder' blog. I will post my bird sightings and photographs on this blog. I started bird watching while studying in university. After graduating with a degree in forestry specializing in parks and recreation management, I have been attached to the parks and gardens industry. My past work experiences involve conducting environmental education program, bird watching and many more.

Bird Watching Tours

There are quite a number of birding groups from Australia, United States and United Kingdom that come over to Malaysia annually visiting the traditional key sites that include Kuala Selangor, Fraser's Hill and Taman Negara.

I am very sure that some of you are interested to do bird watching but unable to join those groups due to the dates of departure that clash with your work. So if you are coming over for birding and intend to hire a guide, you can send me an email at wengchun (AT) gmail (DOT) com and go over to my guiding website to view photos and summary of trip reports with testimonials from past clients.

Besides following the traditional route, I also customized trip according to clients needs, preference and interests. So there are some local patches that I can introduce to all bird watchers, digiscopers and photographers.

Equipment

I use a spotting scope from Omicron for my bird guiding trips and digiscoping. You can get more information from their website at http://omicron-optics.com The spotting scope is placed on a Feisol tripod and Manfrotto 701 video head. This is an ideal setup for me due to its light weight. A customized eyepiece adapter to my Nikon P5100 was fabricated by Cheang Kum Seng from Ipoh, Perak. Very useful during my guiding trips because I get to take photos of birds sighted and post them on my Nature2pixel website. Binocular is the most essential tools for bird watching and guiding. I used to have a Minox 8x42 but have given it to a friend since I upgraded to Nikon 8x42 Monarch. Update: May 2014 - Could be time for me to upgrade to a Kowa 10x42 BD XD which is more compact? I came across this website showing a review of the Nikon D4S at http://www.aaronstours.com

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